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for 60 years. but they learned how to drill sideways, america has much more and cheaper natural gas. this means families pay less to heat their homes. soon america may be elf-sufficient in energy. also, if you are worried about global warming, burning natural gas releases less greenhouse gas than oil or coal. >> flack go feels wrong. it feels like you are pumping stuff into mother earth. >> john: a liberal european environmentalist points out that europe promised to cut greenhouse gas emissions but didn't cut them. >> we managed to cut half what you accidentally happened to do when you stumbled on fracking. >> john: so it brings fuel cheaper, maybe better for the world. why are these people so mad? >> they worry about energy companies shoving these dangerous chemicals into the ground. >> this is seen sfraen a documentary called gas lane. >> the documentary gas land. >> they gave it director an emmy and matt damon features greedy energy companies destroying the promised land. >> if it happens to one of us, it could happen to us all of us. >> john: yoko ono started artists against fra
to the credibility and the future interests of the united states of america and our allies. it matters because a lot of other countries whose policies challenge these international norms are watching. they are watching. they want to see whether the united states and our friends mean what we say. it is directly related to our credibility and whether countries still believe the united states, when it says something. they are watching to see if syria can get away with it because then maybe they, too, can put the world at greater risk. and make no mistake, in an increasingly complex world of sectarian and religious extremist violence what, we choose to do or not do matters in real ways to our own security. some cite the risk of doing things, but we need to ask what is the risk of doing nothing? it matters because if we choose to live in a world where a thug and a murder er like bashar assd can gas thousands of his own people with impunity, even after the united states and our allies said no and then the world does nothing about it, there will be no end to the tested of our resolve and the dangers that w
.5 million this quarter. almost 50% of our business in north america is mobile. we're focused on migrating from being a daily deal e-mail business to being a true e-commerce marketplace where we now have over 54,000 deals live every day in north america. and we're focused on taking what's working in north america where we saw 23% growth in q1 accelerate to 30% in q2. and really give that to the rest of the world. we're by no means done. we've got a long way to go. >> now, you're alluding to the fact that though you have seen significant growth in the u.s., there is still significant weakness internationally. what's your plan to get the rest of the world on track? >> i mean, we saw some good improvement this quarter. europe shrank 8% year over year in q1. and that accelerated to 4% growth in q2. so that's pretty significant growth. we're now focused on taking the stuff that works. we know when we bring more deals to the market it has a huge effect. when we can get consumers to basically start with groupon when they want to buy anything anywhere, any time, we know that has a huge impact. and
call minds in america is set to join us tonight. we're going to ask larry sabato about what's wrong with the deck kratz today. hillary clinton's presidential chnss and get a look at the big new online course and all about the legacy of john f. kennedy. all of those stories and more coming up on "the kudlow report" coming up right now. >>> good evening, everyone. i'm larry kudlow. this is "the kudlow report." the federal reserve minutes. did they tell us anything? steve liesman joins us in jackson hole. >> good evening, larry, from jackson hole where the fed is gathering. they're gathering without ben bernanke and mario draghi. the fed is releasing its minutes from the july meeting in which it showed no clear intention as to the tapering in september. the committee is split with a few members saying the fed should be patient before tapering. there was not enough economic data and a few members saying the fed should stick to the plan announced in june. quote, it might soon be time to taper. almost all of the participants were pretty comfortable with the june guidance which said that t
offered a chilling prediction for america that she calls inevitable. we will cover her less than an uplifting words. next. with centurylink as your trusted partner, our visionary cloud infrastructure and global broadband network free you to focus on what matters. with custom communications solutions and responsive, dedicated support, we constantly evolve to meet your needs. every day of the week. centurylink® your link to what's next. the. lori: and outgoing homeland security secretary napolitano leaves as long as surveying secretary after holding the position 4.5 years this season to a tax of america's sial and our chief corresppndent has our report. >> consider taking questions to napolitano address the national press club here in washington. >> looking back i can say there is one take away one object lesson of a core operating principle i have learned and embraced as secretary it is this, in a world of the fall the threats come to the key to our success is the ability to be flexible and agile. >> the longest serving homeland security secretary also the first woman to hold the
napolitano offered a chilling prediction for america th she calls inevitable. inevitable. we will cover her@áh%h%k%k%k5 aaah! aaaaah! theres a guy on the window! do something, dad! aaaah! aaaah! what is happening? they're rate suckers. their bad driving makes car insurance more expensive for the rest of us. good thing there's snapshot from progressive. snap it in and get a discount based on your goodriving. stop paying for rate suckers. try snapshot free at progressive.com. the. lori: and outgoing homeland security secretary napolitano leaves as long as surveying secretary after holding the position 4.5 years this season to a tax of america's sial and our chief corresppndent has our report. >> consider taking questions to napolitano address the national press club here in washington. >> looking back i can say there is oneake away one object lesson of a core operating principle i have learned and embraceds secretary it is this, in a world of the fall the threats come to the key to our success is the ability to be flexible and agile. >> the longest serving homeland security secretary also th
of america and our allies. it matters because a lot of other countries whose policies challenge these international norms are watching. fate are watching. they want to see whether the united states and our friends mean what we saw a. it is directly related to our credibility and whether country still believe the united states when it says something. they are watching to see if syria can get away with it because then maybe they too can put the world at greater risk. make no mistake. in an increasingly complicated world of sectarian and religious extremist violence, what we choose to do or not do matters in real ways to our own security. some cite the risk of doing things but we need to ask what is the risk of doing nothing? it matters because if we choose to live in a world where a thug and a murderer like the shark assad can gas thousands of his people with impunity even after the united states and our allies said no and then the world does nothing about it there will be no end to the test of hours of the dangers that will flow from those others who believe that they can do as t
on here at home this is a time to get off all foreign oil, especially foreign oil outside of north america. no reason to get off mexican and canadian oil. they're our friends. >> i feel like we've been saying this how many years now. >> beginning of time. >> fought with iraq, get off oil. gas hits $3, get off oil. we're not. nothing is happening. the problem, of course, is no one is making any more money than they were when gas was back at $3. so this is absolutely going to crunch the economy. especially your lower and middle-class people that don't have that much discretionary income to begin wit and now taking more of it. i fill my car up twice a week commuting and taking my kids point a to point b. this will hurt me. >> $4 oil is a killer. that's 40 to $50 dlb out of the economy. cost of goods sold goes up, cost of everything goes up and nothing good happens at that point in time. >> gary, i mean -- >> except for the fact that -- >> go ahead. >> increases new opportunities for people making alternative forms of fuel that are cost prohibitive for investment right now but when you have oi
for america from the steps of the lincoln memorial. his indelible words a watershed moment in the civil rights movement. today thousand also gather to commemorate the famous words that forever changed our country. >> 50 years ago there was so much fear, people were afraid to be afraid. the fear is gone. our country is better and we are a better people. we still have a distance to go. >> reporter: that distance front and center today as the nation's first black president will add his vision as the marquee speaker at the anniversary celebration. president obama acknowledges that, while a lot of progress has been made, king would not be satisfied. >> we have not made as much progress as the civil and social progress that we've made, and that it's not enough just to have a black president. >> reporter: there are renewed calls for addressing socioeconomic and racial disparities. the recent acquittal of george zimmerman and the shooting death of trayvon martin drew many to the streets across the country with protests. the president acting with candor. >> there are very few african-american in this c
in a row is pretty suspicious and bank of america says they'll try to -- >> common practice, it happens constantly with young kids in that -- >> sad story. >> drinking red bull and coffee. >> yeah. >> that's just the culture? >> absolutely. >> but let's not in any way start to assign a bank or anybody else -- >> no, no, not a bank, just the culture of investment banking. >> and it's the culture of the competitive nature for college kids now trying to get jobs. it is, you bust a gut to try to get these, even unpaid internships, maybe not pulling three all-nighters. >>> the "new york daily news." dr. oz came to the rescue of a 23-year-old british tourist. the tourist was sitting near a fountain outside of this building, rockefeller center, when a taxi cab jumped the curb, trying to run down a bicyclist in what witnesses say was a foot of road rage. dr. oz heard the crash and went to the scene to assist the victim along with other first responders. reports say she lost part of one leg. apparently there was a plumber there, he used his belt as a tourniquet and that helped save her life. >>
need to do we need to acquit allies, it cannot look like america jumping in to another civil war in the middle east trying to get involved. this should be the world community coming together, not everybody in the world, we need to make it clear we have no interest in getting in the middle of this civil war, no interest in choosing sides and getting out. lori: can you pinpoint but chemical weapons? can you take out those chemical weapons with a missile strike or do you have to have boots and the ground? do you know the particulars of that? >> some say you have to have. on the ground. everything i read from credible people that i trust say that you can do this from a standoff, you can have ships in the mediterranean, tomahawk cruise missiles equipped in a certain way but if these syrian chemical weapons depots, we know the israelis have done this, they have bombed and taken out syrian chemical weapons sites, i don't know why we couldn't be able to do that but if we go and think we are going to topple assad or kill assad what is the next government that goes after assad? al qaeda. t
for president obama in 2008 the first time with the sincere expectation his election would make america more popular around the globe. that hasn't happened. why? >> it hasn't happened. the president said he was going to remake america's image in the world. i think a lot of people thought because he did have a charismatic personality, certainly the president himself believes himself to be charismatic, he was going to be able to win more friends for america, that america would suddenly be beloved by all. what the president seems not to understand, what is most important in terms of a country's standing is that you are respected not necessarily liked. so the president's effort to make everyone like us i think has made us look weak. >> so it's had the opposite effect? >> that's exactly right. what's happened is, the united states is perceived as, first of all, tenuous about making decisions. we had what happened in egypt, for example, the administration was really i think very slow and has still been slow to understand the muslim brotherhood was not democratic. we had the president drawing lines
-in movie theaters. now the drive-ins threatened with extinction. the vice president of honda america will be here with that companies plan to save drivers coming up. "markets now" continues in a moment. stay with us. see, the special psyllium fiber in metamucil actually gels. and that gelling hes to lower some cholesterol. metacil. 3 amazing benefits in 1 super fiber. hundred pound gorilla of retail, walmart, pressure at this hour responsible for 14 points of losses. the retailer cutting its annual profit forecast, we debate the wear and the why of walmart's problems with our panel. raising the roof on housing yet again, home builder confidence rising to the highest level in eight years. a brand new feature on fox business as we break down home construction costs. plus savings driving movie theaters, once they were plenty but not yet threatened with extinction, vice president of honda america to help save and american institution. it is exactly the top of the hour as we go 15 minutes, stocks and l. the steepest decline since june 20th, nicole petallides watching the data, the numbers
of the united states of america, and to me, everybody that's willing -- strike that. everybody that's able to make that contribution should be forced to do it. then when the congress says that it's mandatory that we send troops, and these troops may be in harm's way, members of congress will hear from their voters, and their voters would say whether or not in their opinion there should be a red line, or in their opinion, whether or not the united states should attack another country, whether you call it war, limited war, the fact remains we were looking for weapons of mass sdru destructions, we didn't find it. so we know what war is, and people that have been involved in war know that it's hell, and it shouldn't be based on drawing red lines. >> you're obviously being very critical of the president right now for drawing that red line. i want to get reaction from your colleague, republican congressman peter king of long island. he's the chairman of the house subcommittee on counterterrorism -- counterintelligence and terrorism. this is a statement. i'll read it to you, congressman. presiden
's the chart. as josh brown pointed out this morning, for those who were -- thought this bet on america, on an american recovery was misguided -- >> or naive. >> slammed it in their face. stock's up 31% this year. >> to go back to the point as well, book value which buffett likes to use, up 2% for the quarter. in a period where travelers, some of the other big insurance competitors suffered because of their exposure to what was happening in the bond market. buffett what does he do? he buys companies. concentrated stakes in equities which did well in the second quarter and that helped outperform a the lot of his peers. >> buy a railroad, utility company in nevada hoping on recovery from recession there. big mac cr macro bets. >> tyson food, 69 cents, beat business 9 cents. revenue a beat. chicken and beef volume, up 4%, hard to do in this in economy. >> especially with beef prices the way they are. >> interesting you mention that. chicken feed costs up $105 million in the quart, less than 335 in the first half. the thinking is, they're looking at commodity costs coming down, even as pric
boy. but anyway, this was actually -- you know, mika, you were probably too young, but america stopped, actually. >> absolutely. >> america stopped and it was -- there was something shocking about a man playing a woman in tennis. >> a man getting his butt kicked. >> well because -- >> yeah. >> joe -- >> paid off. by the way -- >> time to move on -- >> we should have seen this. >> the last gasp of the republican party, right? >> should have seen this a mile away. >> the republican party? >> they don't like women, right? >> it was rigs. >> the only guy -- the only way they could beat a man was if he threw the match, right? >> joe, you're missing a wild -- >> i'm hearing it, but, howard, proves once and for all, the hate mail on twitter today is a marxist because everything, absolutely everything, goes back to politics for marxists. all right. there we go. >> joe calls howard marksesist on -- >> don't -- marxist, everything goes back to politics. >> i don't know no. >> i'm not talking about your ideology but the tennis match and you bring it back to republicans. >> miley cyrus. >> come on
from big government back over to big business, saying corporate america to to blame, why would i draw attention to myself, my firm and industry for that matter and risk -- >> you become a target? >> if you were an indendent, strong talking aigovernment for smaller government business guy, you risk getting shot down by the president. as anti-american in some way, he you i predent who has an open contempt for business in many ways, you didn't build that somebody else did. you have over stock patrick byrne and do gdaddy's bob parson you have people what are willing to tea speak there mind but thee are more people running scared. >> do you think it is hose who do r -- those who do rub folks the wrong wayhat get things done are those who standout, and maybe washington could take a lesson from that to be willing to agitate? >> that is possible we see that in future, but right now talking abouthese leader talking outside the box, upside stops at a distracti, washington is not calling businesses, in what they think in terms of getting america back on track, we're still in a environment wre bu
it worse. >> there's a woman who will be raped in a field in america somewhere today. she has no right in this country. we have to end that. there are children who are going to cry, and there are marriages that are going to be destroyed because someone is going to be deported today, and there's going to be children left orphaned in this country. neil: okay. if those arguments don't work, go for crazy. democratic illinois congressman with a town hall push to get the immigration law done, but that seems to prove here, and i like the congressman, but, boy, looks undone there. anyway, maybe because logic ain't selling it, so go for bonkers. is bongers thinking any good coming from the immigration law that's flawedded? >> don't pass a law versus rather based on threats. don't pass a law based on threats like that. the logic here is that he opened himself up to fear mongering saying, all right, these people who come here illegally and put themselves in harm's way, they wouldn't be in harm's way if they came here legally. being here illegally puts themselves in harm's way. neil: now women are
to silicon valley companies like that, especially google, america's most popular sport and the world's most powerful internet company. could be an interesting conversation. >> absolutely. thanks so much, christine. >> it's got to happen, it's the future. eventually everything will wind up having some digital things. we'll be watching two screens at once. we know t it's a question of how. christine romans we know what she's doing today, little investment decisions. >>> when we come back, climate change, another massive issue, they say we're causing it, is it real? according to an international panel of scientists, grave consequences could be coming. >>> also coming up is senator ted cruz eyeing the white house in 2016? a lot of people are questioning whether he can legally run and a lot of people are putting that to rest. >>> also why the texas lawmaker tells cnn we are in the middle of silly season in politics a head. [ male announcer ] these days, a small business can save by sharing. like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer
of the march on washington. during his remarks he called on america kind of to in his words he said to take on the great unfinished business of the march and he was talking about addressing income disparity, that was one of his big i think themes of the speech. what do you think the big takeaways were of his remarks? a lot of people were waiting to hear what we to say. >> largely will you view this through the prism of your own life and experience. democrats are going to view it differently than republicans, white americans view it differently than african-americans. common things i talked to at the march is they found it less personal and more political than they anticipated. the president only made a brief reference talking about the advancement of african-americans in politics and talked about state government, city government, congress, he said yes, even the white house now. the back half of the speech was about income and equality, education and equality. the president making his case that the country must do more, he needs help from outside washington. that was a key point. change doe
an account. >>> drum roll, please. the top five twitter accounts in corporate america. facebook, google, starbucks, whole foods and walt disney, the mouse house. well, wednesday at 9:00 eastern and pacific the twitter revolution airs on cnbc. it's a new documentary profiling how this company works and how it's changing the world. the story takes us all the way back to found thor jake dorsey's original idea and the first brainstorming session in a san francisco playground seven years ago. >> even as it matures into a serious immediate can a company, twitter has kept its youthful energy and cheeky sense of humor. >> a lot of people around america, they watched us and said this is not like my office. >> not everyone has one of these. life sized tomb raider statues. >> reporter: dick costello is twitter's ceo. he works long days and hits the company gym whenever he can. in social media it's survival of the fittest. >> the average in the company is 25 years old. i'd fall over at 4:00 if i wasn't in good enough shape to keep up with everyone. >> reporter: twitter's rise in just seven years ha
a lot because they sell a lot in north america and same with international including china. finally for gm, the important thing to focus on here is that asia is increasingly being driven by the chinese market, and they are putting more of an emphasis on china when it comes to vehicle development. it's a big change from the early 2002 to 2003 when they bought dae woo out of south korea. at that time, keep in mind, 10, 12 years ago, they had very little expertise when it came to small cars. they needed dae woo, and that's a shame and gm is looking at how can it lower its cost and the record is that they are considering lowering production there. >> thanks very much. over to josh lipton for a three market flash. >> free acquisition to tell you about beginning with dole fruit, well in the green. agreed to be taken private by chair and ceo who raised his offer and back in june he over it at $12 a share. also, pin pall foo-- pinnacle fs down. both companies are leading players in the growing field of aviation information management. tyler, back to you. >> all right, thank you very much, j
by 3.4%. it was hit by natural catastrophes, bad weather essentially, in north america. but also in europe. net profit missing expectations for the second quarter, and companies also pretty cautious about its outlook. last but not least, i want to show you what is happening in the currency space. sterling dollar at a two-month high, sitting at 155.78. getting closer and closer to that 156 level. this is on the back of better -- much stronger than expected retail sales for the month of july. certainly benefitting from that heat wave we have been seeing in the uk. euro dollar pretty resilient at 132.82, back below the 133 level. and dollar yen seeing a little bit of softness at 98.07. this is because the finance minister in japan pretty much quashed hopes of that cut in the corporate tax rate and this is what the markets had been hoping for. so we are seeing some yen strength. and on the back of that, we are seeing declines, pretty big ones, actually, in the nikkei 225. back over to you guys. >> thanks very much, carolin. becky, are you still looking? >> looking for some of these.
countries, north ameri america, northern europe. emerging markets continue to struggle. overall, again, i think we're seeing a near-term issue. but going forward, i think you're going to be really happy with this company and i think over the long term over the next year or two i think you're going see pretty solid and strong growth. >> all right, jim channing sticking with his shares. we watch them down about 7%. moving on now to major news, president obama making a statement moment ace go on egypt. he said the u.s. will cancel joint military exercises with egypt. to help us understand this, john harwood joins us live now from washington with more. john? >> kelly, it was a minimalist response by the president. you had some people including former advisers of his own saying that the united states should suspend or cut off military aid to the egyptian government. the president did not do that. he said that they were going to cancel those bright star military exercises scheduled for next month and continue to consult with his national security team on other steps. what he was trying to do wa
, the islamists in syria will be emboldened, they will say this is america, turned you down again and the mother of arab states will see it as another sign of weakness and iran will be emboldened. >> let's talk about the arab league. those arab nations are not exactly taking a bold stand themselves right now. they've spoken out against the alleged chemical attack in syria, spoken out against bashar al assad but they're not ready to support any kind of military action here. what do they really want? >> the saudis and jordanians and others, their intent is to get rid of this regime. they want to see assad out and they want a tactical defeat of iran and hezbollah. they're not going to participate openly like some did like fattah in libya. one of the reasons we have this tragedy in syria is the regional powers are unable to provide the leadership, europeans on their own cannot provide leadership and because of the dithering of the obama regime, there is no leadership. everybody is waiting for an american leadership, they cannot do it on their own. >> president obama has a tough choice on syria. the
. that is the precursor to what is today macy's. >>> america's farming industry going through a major transition and that could open up bigger opportunities for individuals to invest in farm land. here now to tell us about the risks and rewards about farm land investing is john taylor, at u.s. trust. thank you for coming in today. >> thank you for having me. >> we should set the stage a little bit for why we're at this position. why you might need investors to come in to what used to be family farms. a lot more expensive to be a family farmer and have to be able to have a much bigger land parcel, correct? >> that's right. if you look at the most recent usda report, based on the census they did in 2007, you have farmers who are 65 and older and another 32% 55 and 65, so you kind of add it all up. >> 65% of the farmers. >> 65% of farmers are 5 ye5 yea and older. that's in transition over the next 10, 15 years. you need the next generation of america's farmers on the land. >> is it tougher to get younger people these days to do this? >> in a lot of ways, kids went off to college and they may have g
america, you had no idea. it angers me because there's a responsibility there to the people investing in these companies, listed on that exchange, and, you know, to make sure they're aware of exactly what was going on. and they were left out. >> i think in fairness to greifeld it would be a question of priorities in his view. probably you have a relatively small team, the job has got to be to ensure that financially nobody gets hurt rather than appearing on cable television i think is the point he's trying to make. >> no question. i absolutely agree with that. i'm not saying that. i'm saying if you're sitting in the middle of the country you have no idea what's locked up and why. the press is the only conduit of information to you. i would say that we had an issue with facebook. we had an issue with the flash crash. we had an issue yesterday with what occurred on the nasdaq, technological issue. what i have an issue with is how it's communiqued to the public and how mom and pop in middle america are actually going to get informed on that and they should be informed because they're the
's happening. >> right? it's happening in america. a sad commentary. >> you know what, i saw it on andrew's face. >> depressing. >> why? we have al accomplished so much. >> depressing. >> look at the deficit reduction ha has occurred over the last three years. take it forward. it's 4 trillion over ten years. 4 trillion over ten years. >> you like it. jimmy likes it. yoep i don't understand it. >> the process is ugly. at the end of the day, we actually accomplished something. >> it's good, jimmy? >> 1.4 trillion when bush left office? today 643 billion. that's the number. >> is that good? i think it's fantastic. we should get below 500 billion. should put us where we were before the bush -- >> joe. >> i don't think the white house nodes to unsettle markets any more than they are unsettled. lock at the economy,ist very weak. a lot of underlying weak inside in the economy. why do we need this? there ought to be a negotiation, a discussion. we ought to have a chance to avoid the disaster let's go back to two years ago, i was luxuriously sitting on nan tuvenlth i had to leave to fly back to ne
desire is not to get america into a third middle eastern conflict. but he had gone out and said himself that if the syrian regime used chemical weapons that would be considered a red line. once he put himself out there, i think it was difficult for him given the gravity of this attack, a truly horrendous attack with chemical weapons for him to do nothing. >> ironically, quick take, does russia saying don't do this help the chances that it doesn't have to be a military response? >> no, but my guess would be we're trying to send a message to the russian this is is going to be a limited strike. we're not trying to overthrow assad and that will lead their response to not be that severe. >> peter beinart thank you for the insight. >>> let's turn to dangerous weather at home, the fierce wildfire burning in and around yosemite national park showing no signs of letting up and it's threatening san francisco's water supply and power grid. the rim fire burned through almost 161,000 acres so far, the 13th largest wildfire inle kaical history. cnn's nick valencia is live in groveland, california, tr
. their time. it was bank of america's time before and now it is one of the moments when i look back at my own career and i realize that i had a choice, goldman sachs coming out of harvard law or paul weiss. i took goldman, but it is a paul weiss moment. law firm. i'm going law firm. >> you covered a lot of this when you talked to jamie here on the very floor a few weeks ago. >> yes. >> take a look at this bite. >> this company did great through the crisis, and we trade around the world and trade tr trillions of dollars everyday. we are a good company with flaws. >> you are used past tense. >> yes, there is some compliance and some mortgage and some industry-wide and some unique to us, ap when nd when we looked ae said they were accurate complaints. so we acknowledge the faults and we will fix them. we are not denying it, and we will fix them and make the regulators happy with what we are doing. >> look, a lot of blame to go around and a lot of people hate the bankers, and do you read the store ri and say, boy, i feel bad for jpmorgan and dimon, wow, what a shame. no, you don't. they are big t
develop it. they bought it. $300 million gets you $10 billion. >> awesome. >> welcome to america. >>> now to the markets. and the week ahead. director of fx strategy at bks management and bob ruska is fao economics chief economist. bob, i used to worry that, you know, everything's supposed to just go perfectly according to schedule for the fed to start tapering. and helle is going to be on saying we're going from three years to 3%. you're not sure it's a slam dunk that things keep improving. you think housing looks weak and there's other numbers that aren't cooperating with the fed in terms of showing that we're getting above stall speed. >> the backtrack and new home sales last week was unexpected. it was severe. and it was widespread. and, of course, because new home sales are listed at the time you sign the contract, whereas existing home sales don't get posted until after you close the deal, you see the impact of interest rates and new home sales -- >> you already see it. >> and so yeah. you saw this big decline. and you also saw that average home prices continue to go up or median ho
of america, can i ask you about that industry? obviously the billionaires are advancing on individual titles. you see bezos with "the washington post." the koch brothers may be coming in. warren buffett has been advancing into newspapers. what's the future of the industry in the country. i know you've done studies of how revenue streams ever changing. will it be as strong as it is in two decades? >> it's tremendous you're getting the interest in the investment from very savvy, very smart people from multiple backgrounds. the entire media landscape absolutely is transitioning. digital is changing the way all of us interact with media. i believe that newspapers are uniquely well positioned to take advantage of that transformation. we have unique content whether it's an opportunity newspaper who is covering an event, a sports event, city council that no one else covers, or a national or global brand like "the washington post," like "the new york times." the amount of unique, original content generated by newspapers surpasses any other media and whether it's delivered in print, in digital, onlin
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)

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